Destiny awaits those who will persevere

Dr. Holland

Dr. Billy Holland

Guest columnist

Have you ever made plans to do something but it did not work out? I’m sure that most of us have. Disappointment is not a stranger, especially to those who are ambitious. In fact, they say the more a person tries to accomplish something, the more failures they will encounter. This does not mean that all the doors are locked forever, but included within the process of advancement, it’s necessary to learn self-control while experiencing frustration and distress. Sometimes our diligence brings success while on other occasions we discover that our imaginations are not going to be fulfilled. Even though this is deeply painful, it does not imply that we should go to bed and cover up our head. On the contrary! We do not have time to waste with feeling sorry for ourselves because there is much work to do.

This next intersection is where many people cannot seem to figure out which way to go. Instead of making a choice and proceeding, they end up building their house right in the middle of the road and living there. A crossroad is a place of decision that allows us to keep moving. Staying active even if we miss the mark is better than lying on the couch and hoping that opportunity will fall out of the ceiling. Being honest with ourselves and trusting God can adjust our view and this will go a long way toward aligning our attitude. Number 1: Sometimes our failures are trying to reveal the truth that our dreams are not a part of God’s original plan for our life. So, if our vision is not God’s will, we can simply change it into one that is. Number 2: If we are convinced we are on the right track but still waiting for our breakthrough, then let us patiently keep pressing forward in faith and keep our eye on the prize.

We have heard the story told many times about one of the most successful inventors of all time, Thomas Edison. It is said that he was responsible for over one thousand patents and became famous for his ideas but he is equally respected for his perseverance and his perspective on failure. It is true that humans have variations when it comes to mental “wiring” and in Edison’s brain there was a bulldog determination that had the ability to view consistent failure as simply another stepping stone on the pathway to success. It is true that most people after several valiant attempts, are more than willing to throw in the towel but unlike the average person, it seemed that disappointment did not quench his burning passion to succeed. With several years of research and experimenting, it took 10,000 failures before Edison finally perfected the light-bulb. However, rather than accepting failure the other 9,999 times, he is quoted as saying, “I did not fail, I merely discovered 9,999 ways that do not work!”

Without going into a history lesson, actually there were several more people involved with inventing the light-bulb, but my point is that he made up his mind and was simply never going to give up. Today, there may be something you are sensing in your heart that God has called you to do and I want to encourage you that it can be done! Jesus said, “The things which are impossible with men are possible with God.” Is there anything that God cannot accomplish through you? One of the most common disappointments I hear is from people who are not happy with their life and the answer is always that we have a choice to change or remain the same. Whatever is keeping you from trying is the very obstacle that only you can deal with. To succeed one must come to the point where fear cannot prevent and discouragement cannot persuade. Michael Jordan, considered to be one of the best basketball players of all time missed over half the shots he attempted but the important fact to remember is that he was never afraid to shoot! Destiny awaits those who will persevere.

Dr. Holland lives in Central Kentucky with his wife Cheryl, where he is a Christian author, outreach minister and community chaplain. To learn more visit:

Dr. Holland Holland
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