Aeration system in place at Williamson swimming pool




An aeration system has been placed in the center of the Williamson City Swimming Pool to allow water to circulate so that problem insects do not swarm the pool or surrounding residents.


WILLIAMSON — Residents of the West Williamson area have been concerned with mosquitoes and other insects that thrive on standing water since late spring since Williamson’s Park Board was unable to open the public pool for the 2015 swimming season.

Because the pump that filters the swimming pool water is broken and water has been unable to flow, the water has been standing still and has become stagnant. Stagnant water is a favorite breeding place for mosquitoes, dragonflies and flies in general. When standing water is rarely disturbed it allows the insect larvae to grow into adults and allows them to multiply in abundance.

Moving water is less likely to attract mosquitoes and other insects since they are not able to breed and lay eggs on unstable water movement. Mosquitoes, like most other insects, have several life stages, one of which is the larval stage. During this time, the mosquito lives in standing water, often hanging from the surface tension on top of the water. They hatch from eggs laid on the surface by the female mosquito. Mosquitoes can only lay their eggs on calm water.

Mosquitoes carry a host of diseases including Malaria, Eastern Equine Encephalitis and Yellow Fever. These are very serious diseases. Mosquitoes also carry heart worms to dogs and tapeworms as well. Flies also carry tons of diseases.

Members of the Park Board realizes and understands the hazards that stagnant water may cause to residents and their pets, so after a meeting and coming up with a plan, they have placed an aeration fountain system in the center of the pool to keep the water moving until the current pump is repaired or replaced.

Aeration fountains aerate by pulling water from the surface of the water and propelling it to achieve water circulation. Aeration devices agitate the swimming pool water, taking the place of the pump to keep the surface moving and inhospitable to egg-laying. The agitation disrupts the surface tension of the water, making it difficult for larvae to pursue their customary lifestyle.

An aeration system has been placed in the center of the Williamson City Swimming Pool to allow water to circulate so that problem insects do not swarm the pool or surrounding residents.
http://williamsondailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_w-pool-2.jpg An aeration system has been placed in the center of the Williamson City Swimming Pool to allow water to circulate so that problem insects do not swarm the pool or surrounding residents.

Cindy Moore is a reporter for the Williamson Daily News. To contact Cindy by phone please call 304-235-4242 ext. 2278 or by email at [email protected].

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