Learning how to become a child again


By Dr. Billy Holland - Guest columnnist



Dr. Billy Holland


I remember as a kid how the days seemed so long. In the mornings after breakfast I would shoot basketball until it was too dark to see and be excited to do it all over again the next day. I can still recall the hot sun on my face and running through clover as fast as I could for no reason except to feel the wind on my face. I loved to lie down on our picnic table in the backyard and watch the clouds pass by. It was so much fun to watch them turn into striking images that looked so real and I always wondered if anyone else was noticing this awesome display. On those lazy summer days when the temperature would soar, I would hook up the hose and run through the water sprinkler and then play with my trucks and bulldozers under the cool shade of the trees. I can still hear the sound of a lone airplane that would fly as I would try to locate them within an endless blue sky. At certain times of the year, I would climb our cherry trees and sit high in the branches sharing the delicious fruit with the numerous birds that had the same idea. Life was simple with just the basics of eating, sleeping, riding my bike and watching television in the evenings. I cannot remember being afraid, stressed or anxious about how life would eventually change, I just believed everything would always stay this way.

Well, we all grow up and learn that our journey is always changing and moving forward. I’ve had a blessed life and I’ve learned that of all the things we can do, living in the awareness of God’s love will provide the courage and faith we need to endure whatever may come. As we grow older it seems that time passes more quickly and maybe this is because we are spending way too much of it watching others instead of focusing on what we need to do. When we allow ourselves to become overly absorbed and entangled with the problems of the whole world, this can overload our mind and spirit with sadness and discouragement. However, learning to live an uncomplicated lifestyle can help us as adults to rediscover the simplicity and contentment we once enjoyed. It would be fun to run through a field again and feel the rain on our face and maybe in the evenings we should turn off the TV and take a quiet walk as sharing our thoughts with God would bring peace and calm into our soul. Our Creator did not intend for us to live in a birdcage or an aquarium of anxiety but wants us to fly freely in the heavens and swim in the vast Oceans of His glorious presence.

I was in a restaurant the other day and noticed an elderly couple sitting together in a booth. The woman’s hands were shaking and her food would not stay on the fork. After several attempts she put the fork down and her husband being aware of the problem also put his fork down. He quietly reached over and took her fork, cut the pancake and gently started toward her mouth with a bite. She opened her mouth and accepted without even changing facial expressions. He returned to his plate and then began the compassionate process of taking turns with the bites. My eyes welled up as this scene touched me deeply within my soul and reminded me of how life seems to return full circle. Making the choice to live in a disposition of childlike trust and hope allows us to remain happy because age does not necessarily produce maturity, but comes from spiritual wisdom and understanding. The innocence of a child is precious in God’s sight and He desires that we maintain this perspective of purity and a character of humility, sincerity and love. “Verily I say unto you, except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven” Matthew 18:3.

Dr. Holland lives in Central Kentucky with his wife Cheryl, where he is a Christian author, outreach minister and community chaplain. To learn more visit: billyhollandministries.com

Dr. Billy Holland
http://williamsondailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/web1_Dr.-Bill-Holland.jpgDr. Billy Holland

By Dr. Billy Holland

Guest columnnist

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